Wall-E (2008)

Dir. Andrew Stanton

Pixar has been one of the most trustworthy brands out there. I go to a film just because they’re the ones making it. Wall-E does nothing to weaken that trust, although I didn’t love the film. I think most of the idiots would enjoy this film, so I would recommend it. I think Penny and Grace probably having the best chance of liking this. Next, I’d say Kevin, Tony, Jill and Don. I don’t feel comfortable rating this film as I went with my summer fun kids, so I missed some scenes.

**
The film is about a the trash-compacting robot (Wall-E) that’s still operating after the humans destroy earth. Wall-E goes about his business when all of sudden he has another robot visitor. Is it a friend or foe? You’ll have to watch the film to find out. This is a sci-fi film that may not be really original, but, like many of the other pixar films, does manage to successfully tug at the heartstrings.

Mitchell
Wall-E
7/10

I saw Wall-E late Sunday night (in celebration of completing my first draft). What I love about Pixar films is what Ebert refers to as the artists’ tendency to “paint in the corners.” Visually, it’s just impossible to beat the detail and scope of a Pixar screen. I know Reid wasn’t impressed with Ratatouille’s animation, but I thought that was one of the best ones, animation-wise. I’ve got some screen captures I’ll post later as evidence. Wall-E wasn’t as good-looking as that, but it was still very impressive in that sense. I was captivated by this film’s visuals.

I was also more affected by the story than I expected to be, partially because of the love story but mostly because of the Axiom’s captain’s resolve to do what’s right even in the face of difficulty and overwhelming adversity. Parts of this film reminded me a little bit of The Giver, which I guess isn’t too surprising, given both films’ dystopian themes.

I describe this film as part 2001: A Space Odyssey, part CastAway, and part The Blue Lagoon.

Couple of spoilers:
My friend noticed (and I was really annoyed that I didn’t think of it) that the President of the United States was the only really human-looking character (besides those non-animated portions of My Fair Lady, I think it was, and the photographs in the Axiom’s encyclopedia). I like how Pixar films tend to make the humans look more cartoony than the non-humans, but this part baffled us.

The other thing that bugged me was the fact that the Axiom was soooooo far away from earth! Why would it have to travel that far if the eventual plan was a return? Wouldn’t the Axiom want to stay somewhere in the neighborhood of earth’s orbit, at least, in order to approximate earth’s orbit and climate? The only thing I can figure is that it planned to go out for a period of time and then to turn around, but then it just continued for 700 years on its course because earth’s habitat never became friendly in all that time.

2 Responses to “Wall-E (2008)”


  1. pen

    I loved this movie! It was so cute and adorable, but in a non-cloying, sincere way. From the first scene I was in love with Wall-E. I want to hug him and squeeze him and pet him and love him. I am not sure if I was in particularly cutesy mood, but I want to hug this movie.

  2. Reid

    Pixar has been one of the most trustworthy brands out there. I go to a film just because they’re the ones making it. Wall-E does nothing to weaken that trust, although I didn’t love the film.

    I read the above and I honestly thought, “Hey, who wrote that?” Then I saw the format and said, “No way, that was me!” haha. My how things have changed–and I say this with a sigh. I finally got to see the entire movie, uninterrupted, and I would no longer say the film does NOTHING to weaken our trust in the brand.

    Mitchell said,

    I describe this film as part 2001: A Space Odyssey, part CastAway, and part The Blue Lagoon.

    You’re missing the environmental message and the critique on technology, which are big parts of the film–parts that I had the most problems with. I want to go into them briefly. First, I found the message heavy-handed (e.g., Wall-E bumps into a lady, cutting off her online connection and with dramatic surprise she’s shocked by her actual surroundings) and banal. I don’t know if the latter is a fair criticism, though. It’s a subject I’ve given some thoughts and the points seem pretty obvious. Then again, I’m pretty sure most adults would agree with this. But that’s another point: this is made for children, so the criticism may not be entirely fair.

    The bigger problem might have been the suspense, action sub-plot involving getting the plant to the Captain. To me, this part just wasn’t that interesting. But the bigger problem, for me, involved the way these segments didn’t fit well with my favorite part of the film–the relationship between Wall-E and Eve. In my opinion, you have two main parts to the film: the relationship between Wall-E and Eve and the space ship returning to Earth (which includes the environmental and technology themes, too). The film doesn’t integrate these storylines very well. Am I not seeing a conceptual, thematic or emotional connection between Eve realizing how much Wall-E loves her and the subplot involving the spaceship? Personally, I wish they found a different context for Wall-E and Eve’s relationship.

    On a side note, I do think the quality of Pixar’s animation is quite good, and I’m not sure why I’m not more appreciative and excited about this. I think my satisfaction with the story–or lack thereof–plays a big role in this. I find myself enjoying the animation in The Incredibles more because I liked the story. I don’t know if that fully explains why I’m not more enthusiastic, though.

You can add images to your comment by clicking here.